COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics for the Week of September 24

Tarrant County Public Health hosts numerous pop-up COVID-19 clinics across Tarrant County each week in partnership with public and private organizations listed below. Each site has the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, and some will also have the Johnson & Johnson. Children five and older are eligible for the vaccination. Parents need to bring proof of the child’s age and their own ID for the vaccination. Booster vaccinations are available at all of the vaccination locations.

  
TCPH would like to bring a COVID-19 vaccination clinic to businesses, churches and organizations in the community who are interested in hosting a pop-up clinic. It’s easy and free to host a clinic.
 
In addition to the vaccination opportunities below, the cities of Arlington, Fort Worth, Mansfield, North Richland Hills, Hurst, and Tarrant County College have also added opportunities for vaccinations. To find a local vaccine site, the County created a vaccine finder page: VaxUpTC website.

Pop-Up COVID-19 locations:

Grand Lodge
Saturday, Sep. 24: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
3433 Martin Luther King Jr Freeway
Fort Worth, TX 76119

Foundation Communities  
Tuesday, Sep. 27: 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.
2020 South Cooper St.
Arlington, TX 76013

Tandy Village Assisted Living  
Wednesday, Sep. 28: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
2601 Tandy Ave.  
Fort Worth, TX 76103

Aging Well Expo  
Thursday, Sep. 29: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
1200 Ballpark Way
Arlington, TX 76011

Tarrant County Public Health CIinics:

Northwest Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
3800 Adam Grubb Road
Lake Worth, TX 76135

Bagsby-Williams Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
3212 Miller Ave.
Fort Worth, TX 76119

Southeast Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 6 p.m.
536 W Randol Mill
Arlington TX, 76011

Main Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 6 p.m.
1101 S. Main Street
Fort Worth, TX 76104

Southwest Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
6551 Granbury Road
Fort Worth, TX 76133

Watauga Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
6601 Watauga Road
Watauga, TX 76148

For more information go to coronavirus.tarrantcounty.com or call the Tarrant County Public Health information line, 817-248-6299, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The Last Word – Life Lessons

by Hujefa Vora, MD, Publications Committee Chair

From the Achieves: This Last Word was originally published in the September 2017 issue of the Tarrant County Physician and has been edited for clarity. You can read find the full reprint along with the rest of the content from the July/August 2022 publication here.

He was an amazing businessman.  His acumen, combined with an ability to take the required risks, helped him to build an automobile repair empire.  His smile was infectious.  With it, he instilled a fierce sense of loyalty in his employees and business partners.  And his words.  His Texan twang was musical and fierce.  He could cut a deal in seconds with a “Howdy Y’all” and then a “Sign here . . .”  That’s how he won the heart of his high school sweetheart.  He danced with her from the prom, where he was the King, all the way to the white-washed wedding chapel.  They had four children, each one more beloved than the previous, each with that same smile.  When he first came to me, I could see what they all loved in him.  Despite always being short on time, I would spend the extra few minutes just to laugh at his latest story.  I would adjust his blood pressure medication.  Somewhere along the way, I added a statin.  He did not smoke, and he had no family history.  He was doing well, and so that’s why the stroke came so unexpectedly.  Four years ago, the conditions changed.  The stroke took the entire right side of his body.  He couldn’t walk.  He couldn’t use his right hand and arm.  He was immediately wheelchair-bound.  That was not the worst of it, though.  The worst was when we found out that he had lost his voice.

The stroke hit his speech centers.  He developed an expressive aphasia.  He could understand everything that was said, but he could no longer utter a word.  The damage to Broca’s area was irreparable. His physicians concurred with this assessment.  Perhaps we thought his life was over, or at least the life he had built.  His wife’s love for him was stronger than that, though.  It was stronger than the assault on his brain and body.  She kept him in his business.  She kept him in the game.  She would take him to physical therapy to strengthen his resolve.  She took him to speech therapy and learned his language.  She brought back his smile.

She took him to work every day.  She was his voice in the meetings.  He would smile and grunt, and his empire did not crumble.  Physically, he was weak, but as a partnership, she and her husband held strong.  I remained amazed by all of this whenever I saw them in clinic.  Here was a strong man brought to his knees by a stroke that should have ended him, but instead, he flourished.  He flourished because he had a partner that stood by his side always.  Even as we did not, she understood his every unintelligible utterance, his body language, and above all else, his smile.

I am given the honor of seeing them periodically in the office.  He has had a hospitalization here and there, and she remains his constant companion.  She is his advocate.  She is his voice.  Despite everything we think we know about medical science, she has proven that he is unbreakable.

I often wonder about the intricacies of their relationship.  I wonder at his wife’s ability to understand him.  Most of all, I marvel at their resilience.  Despite overwhelmingly insurmountable odds, they have survived.

Most of all, I marvel at their resilience.  Despite overwhelmingly insurmountable odds, they have survived.

There are so many life lessons I have learned from my patients over the years.  I want to bring only one of these to all of you.  Together, we are stronger.  Despite any of our individual weaknesses, we can always give a voice to one another.  This becomes especially true in our partnerships and relationships outside of our practices.  I am a dinosaur on an island.  I am a solo internist.  How do I ensure that my voice is heard?  I can promise you that the people in Austin and Washington think they know what it is I need and I want.  They think they know what we are saying.  They think that they can fix medicine.  Meanwhile, we think that they are listening to us.  We believe that our intelligence and our charisma will carry the day.  This is in fact our greatest strength and our greatest weakness.  We know we have the answers on how to fix healthcare.  I know this to be a fact.  My fellow physicians, I have heard all of you loud and clear over the past several months.  I have had amazing conversations.  I have gained so much insight into my own difficulties in medical practice, and I have come to a better understanding of so many of the difficulties many of you face in your day to day.  Some of these discussions have led to even deeper insights . . . But there is the rub.  How will we get to action?  Action requires us to understand our greatest weakness.  We help others all day long, and even though we think we have all of the answers, we are unable to really express them.  We too have a form of Broca’s aphasia.  I would assert that we need a partnership to make absolutely certain our voice is heard.  I believe the partner that binds us all together is the Tarrant County Medical Society, in conjunction with the Texas Medical Association.  Many of you have expressed your inability to completely agree with this.  We don’t always agree with our partners 100 percent of the time.  (Don’t tell my wife this!)  Moreover, we need a partner and an advocate that speaks our language and understands us.

Maybe I’m just preaching to the choir.  In the end, we will all need to continue to work together, not individually . . . We must come together and make sure that our voice is heard loud and clear . . . They will hear us.  Kumbaya.  My name is Hujefa Vora, and this is our Last Word.

5th Annual Ralph J. Anderson, MD Women’s Health Symposium

The 5th Annual Ralph J. Anderson, MD Women’s Health Symposium will showcase the advances made in women’s health care in both Tarrant and Dallas Counties. It was created to honor Dr. Anderson, who dedicated a large portion of his career to the education of health care professionals in the field of obstetrics and gynecology. For more than 20 years Dr. Anderson developed, moderated, and oversaw a yearly large educational symposium to ensure that practicing health care professionals continued their education to improve patient care and patient outcomes.

Registration

You can register for the symposium here.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, learners will be able to:

  • Define two strategies to improve health outcomes of women in DFW metroplex;
  • Diagnose and define uncomplicated vaginitides using evidence-based methodology;
  • Define maternal morbidity and mortality related to Placenta Accreta Spectrum Disorder;
  • Describe the current burden of substance use disorders (SUD) women experience in the US; and
  • Identify key points of progress in our understanding of human trafficking and healthcare responses for readying its workforce.

Topics Covered

At the Women’s Health Symposium you will learn from distinguished leaders in the field of women’s health on such topics as:

  • Placenta Accreta
  • Advances in New Born Care & Breastfeeding
  • Palliative Medicine
  • Overactive Bladder
  • Fetal Surgery Innovations
  • Adolescent Health
  • Trafficking and Opioid Abuse

Price for Virtual Attendees

Registration fee: $120

Who Should Attend

Physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, nurses and social workers caring for women will all find something of practical value at the 2022 Women’s Health Symposium.

Join TMA’s 2022 Fall Conference This Weekend

TMA’s annual Fall Conference will be held this weekend in Austin, TX! Register now to join the event, where you will have the opportunity to network with other physician, conduct TMA business, and go to CMEs and lectures centered around top healthcare issues and interests.

Here are the details:

When: September 16-17, 2022

Hotel: Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort and Spa

Parking Information: Daily self-parking is $12.00 for attendees and hotel guests. Guests not staying overnight can pick up a voucher at the TMA registration desk. Overnight valet parking is $38 plus tax, no in/out privileges.

Agenda

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16

  • 7:30am – 7:30pm Registration Hours
  • 1:00 – 5:00pm Exhibits, Lost Pines Ballroom Foyer
  • Many boards, councils, and committees hold business meetings in conjunction with Fall Conference.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17

  • 6:30 – 12:30am Registration Hours
  • 7:00-noon Exhibit Hours
  • 7:30-8:30am Dawn Duster, Lost Pines Ballroom 57:30-8:30 am Networking Breakfast and Exhibits, Lost Pines Ballroom Foyer9-11:45 am General Session, Lost Pines Ballroom 5
    9-9:30 am Welcome and TMA Update
  • 9:30-10:30 am Take Charge of Your Career: Harness the Power of Negotiation (CME)
  • 10:30-10:45 am Break and Exhibits
  • 10:45-11:45 am Legislative Panel (CME) Hear from our physician legislators with a recap of the 87th Legislative Session and what to expect from the special session next month.

You can view the full schedule here.

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