COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics for the Week of September 24

Tarrant County Public Health hosts numerous pop-up COVID-19 clinics across Tarrant County each week in partnership with public and private organizations listed below. Each site has the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, and some will also have the Johnson & Johnson. Children five and older are eligible for the vaccination. Parents need to bring proof of the child’s age and their own ID for the vaccination. Booster vaccinations are available at all of the vaccination locations.

  
TCPH would like to bring a COVID-19 vaccination clinic to businesses, churches and organizations in the community who are interested in hosting a pop-up clinic. It’s easy and free to host a clinic.
 
In addition to the vaccination opportunities below, the cities of Arlington, Fort Worth, Mansfield, North Richland Hills, Hurst, and Tarrant County College have also added opportunities for vaccinations. To find a local vaccine site, the County created a vaccine finder page: VaxUpTC website.

Pop-Up COVID-19 locations:

Grand Lodge
Saturday, Sep. 24: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
3433 Martin Luther King Jr Freeway
Fort Worth, TX 76119

Foundation Communities  
Tuesday, Sep. 27: 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.
2020 South Cooper St.
Arlington, TX 76013

Tandy Village Assisted Living  
Wednesday, Sep. 28: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
2601 Tandy Ave.  
Fort Worth, TX 76103

Aging Well Expo  
Thursday, Sep. 29: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
1200 Ballpark Way
Arlington, TX 76011

Tarrant County Public Health CIinics:

Northwest Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
3800 Adam Grubb Road
Lake Worth, TX 76135

Bagsby-Williams Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
3212 Miller Ave.
Fort Worth, TX 76119

Southeast Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 6 p.m.
536 W Randol Mill
Arlington TX, 76011

Main Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 6 p.m.
1101 S. Main Street
Fort Worth, TX 76104

Southwest Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
6551 Granbury Road
Fort Worth, TX 76133

Watauga Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
6601 Watauga Road
Watauga, TX 76148

For more information go to coronavirus.tarrantcounty.com or call the Tarrant County Public Health information line, 817-248-6299, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Public Health Notes

By Catherine Colquitt, MD, Tarrant County Public Health Medical Director

This article was originally published in the July/August 2022 issue of the Tarrant County Physician. You can read find the full magazine here.

In 1994, the Public Health National Center for Innovations and the de Beaumont Foundation collaborated with partners to establish the Essential Public Health Services (EPHS), and on September 9, 2020, the first updated version of the original EPHS was released.1,2 As we celebrate a much-needed decrease in COVID-19 cases and deaths, it seems timely to review the updated EPHS, take stock, and plan for the future.

First, here is the 2020 version of our EPHS:


Analysis of our public health response to COVID-19 reveals successes and shortcomings. The successes include scaling up to investigate COVID-19 cases, clusters, and contacts in real time, even when hundreds of cases were occurring daily, and ramping up, with our partners, to administer 2,995,204 doses of vaccines in Tarrant County since the first vaccine allocations became available in December 2020.3 As a result, 85.87 percent of  Tarrant County residents 65 years or older and 61.37 percent of Tarrant County residents  aged five years through 64 years are now fully vaccinated.4   We have also worked effectively with state and local agencies, municipalities and other partner entities to vaccinate staff and vulnerable people in congregate settings. Alongside all of this, we have expanded our communications apparatus to keep our county residents informed of changing COVID-19 guidance, vaccine and testing availability, and to bridge language, cultural, and other social and systemic barriers that have prevented some in our community from accessing COVID-19 related care.   

But we have much to do. Many in our county still experience barriers to health care access and are confused by widely circulated myths about COVID-19 infection, control measures, and vaccination. While current COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations, deaths and outbreaks are falling, we and our partners are working to provide accurate and culturally sensitive messaging to residents in North Texas who may have felt excluded from access to COVID-19 related care and information thus far.  Tarrant County Public Health is embedding mobile healthcare in communities in need; it is a move based on advice from community leaders and aided by precision mapping and real-time syndromic surveillance. 

Challenges to COVID-19 response include differences in approach to the pandemic among local, state, and federal entities. There have also been disparities in not only healthcare access, but also public transportation services to facilitate travel to sites for COVID-19 vaccination, testing, and treatment. An addition, access disparities between rural and urban North Texas communities and language, cultural, and religious barriers to COVID-19 related care have further complicated the situation.

Building a more diverse public health workforce and collecting detailed community needs assessments with guidance from respected community leaders and partners are important steps toward improvement. Using innovative strategies for our outreach efforts will help tremendously in the development of verifiably successful measures to make our community safer during the next COVID-19 surge, and during the next public health challenge – like maybe monkeypox! 

References

1. Harrell, JA, Baker, EL. The essential services of public health.  Leadership Public Health. 1994; 3(3): 27-30

2. Revised 10 Essential Public Health Services, launched virtually by the de Beaumont Foundation and Public Health National Center for innovations on 9/9/2020.  Available at http://www.cdc.gov. Background information of steps leading to the revision of guidance available at http://www.PHNCI.org

3. Texas COVID-19 Vaccine Tracker (by county)

4. Texas Department of State Health Services COVID-19 Dashboard

This Week’s COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics in Tarrant County

Tarrant County Public Health hosts numerous pop-up COVID-19 clinics across Tarrant County each week in partnership with public and private organizations listed below. Each site has the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines and at times the Johnson & Johnson. Infants 6 months and older are eligible for the vaccination. Parents need to bring proof of the child’s age and their own ID for the vaccination. Booster vaccinations are available at all of the vaccination locations.

  
TCPH would like to bring a COVID-19 vaccination clinic to businesses, churches and organizations in the community who are interested in hosting a pop-up clinic. It’s easy and free to host a clinic.
 
In addition to the vaccination opportunities below, the cities of Arlington, Fort Worth, Mansfield, North Richland Hills, Hurst, and Tarrant County College have also added opportunities for vaccinations. To find a local vaccine site, the County created a vaccine finder page: VaxUpTC website.

Pop-Up COVID-19 locations:

Greater Saint Stephen First Church  
Monday, July 18: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
3728 E. Berry St.
Fort Worth, TX 76105

The Connect
Community Crossroads
Tuesday, July 19: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
1516 Hemphill St.  
Fort Worth, TX 76104

Tarrant County Public Health CIinics:

Northwest Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
3800 Adam Grubb Road
Lake Worth, TX 76135

Bagsby-Williams Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
3212 Miller Ave.
Fort Worth, TX 76119

Southeast Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
536 W Randol Mill
Arlington TX, 76011

Main Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
1101 S. Main Street
Fort Worth, TX 76104

Southwest Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
6551 Granbury Road
Fort Worth, TX 76133

Watauga Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
6601 Watauga Road
Watauga, TX 76148

The Vaxmobile is a partnership between Tarrant County Public Health and Trinity Metro to bring COVID-19 vaccines to underserved communities throughout Tarrant County. The 60-foot bus converted to a fully equipped mobile vaccine clinic, will make weekly stops in the areas with the lowest vaccination rates on Thursdays. Vaccinations are also available at the six Tarrant County Public Health clinics listed above every day of the week.

For more information go to coronavirus.tarrantcounty.com or call the Tarrant County Public Health Call Center, 817-248-6299, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics for the Week of June 25

Tarrant County Public Health hosts numerous pop-up COVID-19 clinics across Tarrant County each week in partnership with public and private organizations listed below. Each site has the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines and at times the Johnson & Johnson. Children five and older are eligible for the vaccination. Parents need to bring proof of the child’s age and their own ID for the vaccination. Booster vaccinations are available at all of the vaccination locations.

  
TCPH would like to bring a COVID-19 vaccination clinic to businesses, churches and organizations in the community who are interested in hosting a pop-up clinic. It’s easy and free to host a clinic.
 
In addition to the vaccination opportunities below, the cities of Arlington, Fort Worth, Mansfield, North Richland Hills, Hurst, and Tarrant County College have also added opportunities for vaccinations. To find a local vaccine site, the County created a vaccine finder page: VaxUpTC website.

Pop-Up COVID-19 locations:

Everman Public Library
Saturday, June 25: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
100 North Race St.
Everman, TX 76140

Austin Company-Health Expo
Saturday, June 25: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
2029 North Main St.
Fort Worth, TX 76164

Greater Saint Stephen First Church
Monday, June 27: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
3728 East Berry St.
Fort Worth, TX 76105

Vaxmobile – Saint John Cathedral  
Thursday, June 30: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
2501 East Berry St.
Fort Worth, TX 76105

Worth Heights Community Center
Thursday, June 30: 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
3551 New York Ave.
Fort Worth, TX 76110

Lamar High School    
Friday, July 1: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
1400 W. Lamar Blvd.
Arlington, TX 76012

Tarrant County Public Health CIinics:

Northwest Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
3800 Adam Grubb Road
Lake Worth, TX 76135

Bagsby-Williams Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
3212 Miller Ave.
Fort Worth, TX 76119

Southeast Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 6 p.m.
536 W Randol Mill
Arlington TX, 76011

Main Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 6 p.m.
1101 S. Main Street
Fort Worth, TX 76104

Southwest Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
6551 Granbury Road
Fort Worth, TX 76133

Watauga Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
6601 Watauga Road
Watauga, TX 76148

The Vaxmobile is a partnership between Tarrant County Public Health and Trinity Metro to bring COVID-19 vaccines to underserved communities throughout Tarrant County. The 60-foot bus converted to a fully equipped mobile vaccine clinic, will make weekly stops in the areas with the lowest vaccination rates on Thursdays. Vaccinations are also available at the six Tarrant County Public Health clinics listed above every day of the week.

For more information go to coronavirus.tarrantcounty.com or call the Tarrant County Public Health information line, 817-248-6299, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Tarrant County to begin administering COVID-19 vaccine to infants and toddlers

Tarrant County Public Health will begin administering the COVID-19 vaccine to children six months to five years of age at all TCPH clinics, public pop-up clinics, and the Vaxmobile starting on Wednesday, June 22, 2022.

Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines will be available to protect this age group. Infants six months through four years of age receiving the Pfizer vaccine series will need to get two doses, three weeks apart, and a third at least two months later. The dosage of Pfizer for infants is one-tenth of the dosage for adults. The Moderna vaccine series for infants six months through five years of age will consist of two doses, four to eight weeks apart, and it will be a quarter of the dosage of Moderna for adults. A third dose of Moderna has been approved for immunocompromised infants in this age group, at least one month after the second dose.

The CDC now recommends the COVID-19 vaccine for children and adolescents six months of age and older. COVID-19 has become one of the top 10 causes of pediatric death, and tens of thousands of children and teens have been hospitalized because of the virus. While children and adolescents are typically at lower risk than adults of becoming severely ill or hospitalized from COVID-19, the effects of the virus are unpredictable. Vaccination is the best way to protect children from COVID-19.

The COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective. Before it was authorized for children across age groups, scientists and medical experts reviewed safety and effectiveness data from clinical trials involving thousands of children.

Tarrant County Public Health Clinics:

Northwest Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
3800 Adam Grubb Road
Lake Worth, TX 76135

Bagsby-Williams Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
3212 Miller Ave.
Fort Worth, TX 76119

Southeast Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 6 p.m.
536 W Randol Mill
Arlington TX, 76011

Main Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 6 p.m.
1101 S. Main Street
Fort Worth, TX 76104

Southwest Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
6551 Granbury Road
Fort Worth, TX 76133

Watauga Public Health Center
Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.
6601 Watauga Road
Watauga, TX 76148

COVID-19 causes respiratory illness with cough, fever and shortness of breath and may lead to bronchitis and severe pneumonia. For more information go to the TCPH coronavirus page or call the Tarrant County Public Health information line, 817-248-6299, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Hidden Costs of COVID-19

Public Health Notes

By Catherine Colquitt, MD

This article was originally published in the March/April 2022 issue of the Tarrant County Physician. You can read find the full magazine here.

In response to soaring overdose deaths across the U.S. during the pandemic, the American Medical Association (AMA) Advocacy Resource Center published a brief on Nov. 21, 2021, cataloging increased overdose deaths state-by-state. They decried decreased access to “evidence-based care for substance use disorder, chronic pain, and harm reduction services.”1

The AMA also sent a letter to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urging requirements for health insurers to eliminate barriers to opioid treatment for patients who would benefit from these therapies (think prior authorizations for prescriptions and faxed referrals for specialists). The letter also supported the Biden Administration’s 2022 National Drug Control Strategy, which highlights increased production of medications for substance use disorders, harm reduction strategies (including needle and syringe exchange programs), access to naloxone without prescription, and elimination of health insurer obstacles which prevent persons with chronic pain from accessing pain management.

In addition, a letter from AMA’s Dr. James Madara, MD, to Regina M. LaBelle, the acting director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, on July 9, 2021, stated that healthcare inequities and social determinants of health fueling the overdose epidemic and disproportionately affecting the “marginalized and minoritized” must be addressed.2

The National Vital Statistics System recently released its “Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts” for 2021 for the fifty states and the District of Columbia.4 The total overdoses will likely be revised upwards as case compilations for 2021 are completed and reports verified, but the provisional death toll is staggering. Over the 12-month period which ended in June 2021, overdose deaths rose from 47,523 to 98,022, and in Tarrant County, our overdose deaths mirror the national trend with 350 overdose deaths for the 12-month period ending March 2021, compared with 185 overdose deaths for the 12-month period ending January 2021. (Tarrant County data are not yet available for April – December 2021 on the NVSS dashboard.) 

Overdose deaths provide one measure of the toll of COVID-19 in the U.S. and expose need for redress of healthcare inequities, access to medication for opiate use disorders, substance use disorder treatment, mental healthcare access, and access to pain management. Another way the impact of COVID-19 is being assessed is through peer-reviewed publications exploring the hidden costs and benefits of conventional in-person (commuter) work versus work from home. 

“Over the 12-month period which ended in June 2021, overdose deaths rose from 47,523 to 98,022, and in Tarrant County, our overdose deaths mirror the national trend with 350 overdose deaths for the 12-month period ending March 2021, compared with 185 overdose deaths for the 12-month period ending January 2021.”

The results of such studies are uneven and the responses necessarily somewhat subjective when subjects are questioned regarding their feelings about in-person versus telework; in general, workers viewed telework more favorably when they volunteered for it and when their schedules included a combination of both in-person and telework. When mandatory, some teleworkers experienced increased “work-family conflict” as the lines between work and domestic life blurred during telework. Teleworkers and conventional in-person workers reported variable effects on depression, exhaustion, fatigue, and energy level.5

Using data from the American Time Use Survey, authors asked workers to record in a diary where they worked (whether they commuted or not) and noted that male teleworkers in this study reported lower pain, stress, and tiredness levels, but that there was no difference in these measures among female commuters versus non-commuters.6

In another study based on the American Time Use Survey, the designers compared pain in working-at-home versus conventional workers and found no difference in pain reporting between the two groups. However, working-at-home fathers reported increased stress and working-at-home mothers reported decreased happiness.7

COVID-19 is, at the very least, an engine powering academic inquiry, which may have unexpected future benefits for the way healthcare is delivered and work is done.  In the meantime, we must continue the important work of educating, advocating, and caring for our communities.

References
1. AMA Advocacy  Resource Center:  Issue brief: Nation’s drug-related overdose and death epidemic continues to worsen, Updated 11/12/2021 

2. AMA letter to Regina M. LaBelle, Acting Director of Office of National Drug Control Policy, 7/9/2021

3. AMA letter to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 2020

4. National Vital Statistics System Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts – NVSS dashboard for current data, with final data when available from https://www.cdc.gov/nchc/nvss/mortality_public_use_data.htm

5. Oakman J et al. A rapid review of mental and physical health effects of working at home: how do we optimize health? BMC Public Health (2020) 20:1825

6. Song Y, Gao J. Does telework stress employees out? A study on working at home and subjective well-being for wage/salary workers J Happiness Stud 2019;21(7):2648-68

7.   Gimenez-Nadal JI, Molina JA, Velilla J. Work time and well-being for workers at home: evidence from the American Time Use Survey. Int J Manpow 2020; 41(2): 184-206

How to Use and Store At-Home COVID-19 Tests Properly to Avoid Potential Harm

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is alerting people that there is a potential for harm if  at-home COVID-19 tests are not used according to the manufacturer’s test instructions. Here are their recommendations for safe and effective at-home testing:

Recommendations  

  • Keep all parts of at-home COVID-19 test kits out of reach from children and pets before and after use. 
  • Store the at-home COVID-19 test in its box until you are ready to use it. 
  • Follow the manufacturer’s step by step test instructions exactly.  
    • Read the Warning, Precautions, And Safety Information in the test instructions for a description of chemical ingredients and recommendations for safe handling and what to do if they accidentally touch your skin or eyes. 
    • Keep the liquid solution away from the skin, nose, mouth, and eyes. Do not swallow the liquid solution. 
    • Use only the swab in the test kit to collect a nasal sample. 
  • After you perform the test: 
    • Follow all test instructions for how to throw away the used test parts.   
    • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water. 

Get medical help right away by contacting your local poison control or health care provider if:  

  • Skin or eye irritation does not go away after exposure. 
  • A person or animal swallows the liquid solution. 

Avoid Potential Harm from Incorrect Use of At-Home COVID-19 Tests 

At-home COVID-19 diagnostic test kits include different parts such as a test cartridge, nasal swab, and small plastic vials containing liquid solutions needed to perform the test. The liquid solutions may include chemical ingredients, such as sodium azide, that help the test work properly or act as preservatives. The test chemicals can be irritating or toxic if they get on your skin, nose, or eyes or if they are swallowed. 

The FDA has received reports of injuries caused by incorrect use of at-home COVID-19 tests, including: 

  • Injuries caused by people accidently putting liquid test solution in their eyes when small vials of test solution were mistaken for eye drops.   
  • Injuries caused by placing nasal collection swabs into the liquid solution prior to swabbing the nose (the liquid solution is not supposed to touch your body).  
  • Injuries caused by children putting test parts in their mouth and swallowing liquid test solution. 

Tarrant County COVID-19 Activity – 03/02/22


COVID-19 Positive cases: 558,677

COVID-19 related deaths: 5653

Recovered COVID-19 cases: 539,665

Data from Tarrant County Public Heath’s (TCPH) report of COVID-19 activity in Tarrant County updated Wednesday, March 2, 2o22. Find more COVID-19 information from TCPH here.

*These data are provisional and are subject to change at any time.

Deaths and recovered cases are included in total COVID-19 positive cases.

COVID-19 trends in Tarrant County and questions about the pandemic’s future

Tarrant County Public Health Director Vinny Taneja and Allergist/Immunologist Robert Rogers, MD, spoke with Lili Zheng of NBC5 on the state of COVID-19 in Tarrant County and the things that could impact the direction on the pandemic in the coming months:

“I think the real wildcard is, do enough people have immunity to prevent another surge? That’s one. Another would be, are we going to deal with another variant?”

Dr. Robert Rogers

You can watch the video below or read the full story here.

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