Tarrant County’s First Positive Human Case of West Nile Virus in 2022 Season Confirmed

Tarrant County Public Health (TCPH) confirms the first human case of West Nile Virus (WNV) for the 2022 season. The first positive mosquito pool was reported in May 2022.

The individual involved resides in northwest Tarrant County. The person presented the mild form of the disease which is often referred to as WNV fever. Symptoms include headache, fever, muscle and joint aches, nausea, and fatigue. People typically recover on their own, although symptoms may last for several weeks. It was reported that the individual had outdoor activities within the incubation period. There have been no WNV-positive mosquito pools in the associated area. Additional details are not being released to protect the identity of the patient.

To date, TCPH has found a total of 7 WNV-positive mosquito pools within Tarrant County. Monitoring for the virus in mosquito pools is ongoing throughout the season (April through mid-November). Local cities and Tarrant County for unincorporated areas may perform mosquito treatment as needed.

TCPH reminds residents to take measures to safeguard against the WNV. Residents should dump standing water on their property, use repellent, and whenever possible, dress in long pants and long sleeves.

MORE ABOUT MOSQUITOES:

  • Mosquitoes need water to breed. They don’t lay their eggs in the air or on the ground, so dump ALL standing water.
  • Infected mosquitoes transmit WNV to people after feeding on infected birds.
  • Birds don’t transmit WNV to people. Mosquitos do.
  • Larvicides are products used to eliminate mosquitoes before they become adults.
  • Apply larvicides directly to water sources that hold mosquito larvae.

For more information about West Nile Virus visit the Be Mosquito Free webpage.

Sign Up for TMA’s 2022 Fall Conference

TMA’s annual Fall Conference will be here before we know it! Register now to join the event, where you will have the opportunity to network with other physician, conduct TMA business, and go to CMEs and lectures centered around top healthcare issues and interests.

Here are the details:

When: September 16-17, 2022

Hotel: Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort and Spa
Rates start at $229 plus $10 resort fee. Room cut-off date is August 17, 2022. 

Parking Information: Daily self-parking is $12.00 for attendees and hotel guests. Guests not staying overnight can pick up a voucher at the TMA registration desk. Overnight valet parking is $38 plus tax, no in/out privileges.

Agenda

Friday, September 16

  • 7:30am – 7:30pm Registration Hours
  • 1:00 – 5:00pm Exhibits, Lost Pines Ballroom Foyer
  • Many boards, councils, and committees hold business meetings in conjunction with Fall Conference.

Saturday, September 17

  • 6:30 – 12:30am Registration Hours
  • 7:00-noon Exhibit Hours
  • 7:30-8:30am Dawn Duster, Lost Pines Ballroom 57:30-8:30 am Networking Breakfast and Exhibits, Lost Pines Ballroom Foyer9-11:45 am General Session, Lost Pines Ballroom 5
    9-9:30 am Welcome and TMA Update
  • 9:30-10:30 am Take Charge of Your Career: Harness the Power of Negotiation (CME)
  • 10:30-10:45 am Break and Exhibits
  • 10:45-11:45 am Legislative Panel (CME) Hear from our physician legislators with a recap of the 87th Legislative Session and what to expect from the special session next month.

You can view the full schedule here.

CALL FOR MUSICAL PHYSICIANS: Join Fort Worth’s First Medical Orchestra

by Allison Howard

This article was originally published in the July/August 2022 issue of the Tarrant County Physician. You can read find the full magazine here.

Physicians, dust off your instruments—Fort Worth’s first medical orchestra is looking for healthcare workers who have a dual passion for music and medicine.

The group, which is being organized by retired physical therapist and flautist Susan Fain, is expected to begin rehearsing this fall.  While the details are still being ironed out, Susan says that everything is falling into place.

“We are collaborating and negotiating for a space, conductors, and music,” she says.  “And it looks really good.”

Susan, who holds doctoral degrees in both physical therapy and flute performance, was first inspired about 10 years ago when she heard the Doctors Orchestral Society of New York. She soon discovered there were over 30 such orchestras throughout the U.S., and she saw it as the perfect opportunity to marry her passions.

“In medicine you’re helping people, and in music, you really are helping people,” she says. “You’re helping yourself, learning to create, and all of that discipline is across both professions.”

She believes this could be a step toward work-life balance for those who love sharing music with others but have set their instruments aside due to lack of opportunity. Now, she is ready to create that opportunity, and she is thrilled to do so in a city that is rife with a passion for the arts.

Susan, whose career was divided between practicing physical therapy, pursuing music, and raising her five children, has played flute in both civic and professional orchestras. And her experience organizing events and groups is extensive, ranging from planning classical concerts to putting together a small orchestra (where she served as the conductor!). Now, retired from physical therapy and ready to devote herself fully to her love of music, she is thrilled to start this next endeavor.  

“I want to be like Esther – ‘You might have been born for such a time as this,’” Susan says. “To bring the two halves of my life together and make them both count.”

It seems she isn’t the only one that feels that way. As the word spreads there has been a lot of interest; so far, 10 instrumentalists have committed to the orchestra, and more have expressed a desire to get involved. 

Ultimately, Susan’s goal is to form a full orchestra that will perform a handful of concerts each year to raise support for local charities. She believes it will enrich the community and be a chance to cut through much of the noise created by the constant challenges in the practice of medicine.

“Performing is like creating an oasis for the audience,” she says. “This is a moment where you can forget the outside world, and all the things going on in society that we struggle with, and we can sit for a moment and just stop and reflect on truth and beauty. That, to me, is what it’s all about.”

For more information about the Fort Worth Medical Orchestra, contact Susan Fain at sdfain1@gmail.com or 405-830-2107. 

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